Sign Salad Loves: December 2016

1 December 2016 | By Sign Salad
twitter

‘Tis the season to be jolly, and to round up the things that made us smile (and think) in the world of brands this past month. Now bring us some figgy semiotics:

  • The museums of the future may not only show us new things, but also teach us how to see them. Put your headphones on…

screen-shot-2016-12-01-at-10-13-21

  • On the subject of museums, London’s Design Museum is newly nestled in Kensington. Whilst the Fear and Love exhibition asks challenging questions about the future of tech and people power, we particularly enjoyed the attention given to everyday objects of design, and what they tell us about cultural shifts.

fear-and-love-3

  • Is IKEA a flat-packed myth of Swedishness, from which there can be no deviation? Tom Cubbin explores for Dezeen.

ikea-museum-credit-jonas-lindstrom_hero

  • Penguin publishers bring us ‘Default Man‘, a mini computer game to tie in with Grayson Perry’s book The Descent of Man. Explore a digital urban world whilst exploring stereotypes of manhood.

screen-shot-2016-11-28-at-11-54-30-981x500

  • H&M have enlisted Wes Anderson’s singular cinematic skills for a quaintly dazzling Christmas campaign. Expect the usual motifs: trains, disaffection, symmetry and sublime style.

wes-anderson-hm-christmas-ad-2

For more analysis of this year’s Christmas ads, have a read of our blog post Solving Christmas: a closer look at this year’s ads.

Got a semiotic story to share with us? Tweet it @signsalad.

Post a Comment

Your email is never shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

Popular tags...

semiotics UK news advertising fashion consumption talk consumers design Christmas branding retail politics digital awards humans pets post-feminist film google government publishing jewellery global masculinity Lynx sonic semiotics packaging tobacco branding adapting innovation Australia trademark logo Jesus food eating Unilever business seminar chauvinism irony Yorkie failure failing success Judith Halberstam Tim Harford corporate culture Kathryn Schulz