Sign Salad Loves: Christmas 2015

23 December 2015 | By Sign Salad
GlamAsia-10-November-2015-Mulberry-Releases-2015-Holiday-Video-3

A seasonal look at the campaigns and branding that caught our eye amidst the flurry of festive marketing… 

  • Rakvere in Estonia codes the warming light of Christmas cheer through its symbolic tree, constructed from recycled windows:

estonia tree

  • In a campaign that narrowly dodged an ad watchdog ban, Mulberry replaces the baby Jesus with a red handbag – a materialist nativity for the upper social echelons?

Screen Shot 2015-12-22 at 15.16.52

  • Londoners still in need of stocking stuffers can browse these beautiful independent periodicals, from the well-known to the positively obscure
Photo: Owen Richards

Photo: Owen Richards

  • What is it about the Edeka campaign that has seen it effortlessly overtake the competition to become the most shared Christmas ad of 2015? John Lewis’ Man on the Moon is brought down to Earth in the poignant #heimkommen campaign 

edeka-hed-2015

  • The force is strong with Star Wars branding, which has found its way to Covergirl cosmetics, Duracell, Kraft mac’n’cheese, Google and many more- ironic, perhaps, when the film is about fighting corporate villainy in the form of the Galactic Empire?

dooku

For a more in-depth look at the branding of Christmas in 2015, be sure to read this Canvas8 piece. Our CEO Alex Gordon decodes the nation’s favourite ads, broadly divided between sentimental mythologies and a more cynical, post-structuralist approach…

mogthecat

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